Baby in birth cloth

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Sep 19th, 2014

From redwineandapplesauce.com

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Sep 19th, 2014

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Sep 11th, 2014

Premature infants are at increased risk for a potentially lethal gastrointestinal disease called necrotizing enterocolitis, or NEC. Studies conducted by researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles demonstrate that a protein called neuregulin-4 (NRG4)—present in breast milk, but absent from formula—may be protective against the intestinal destruction caused in NEC. Their results will be published online on September 9 in advance of the print edition of the American Journal of Pathology.

Thirty percent of babies with NEC die from their disease, and even survivors can face lifelong consequences that may include removal of part of their intestine and dependence upon intravenous nutrition. Formula feeding is a known risk factor for the disease.

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Sep 10th, 2014

‘Infant Start’ therapy removes disabling delay before most children are diagnosed

Treatment at the earliest age when symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appear – sometimes in infants as young as 6 months old – significantly reduces symptoms so that, by age 3, most who received the therapy had neither ASD nor developmental delay, a UC Davis MIND Institute research study has found.

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Sep 10th, 2014

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Sep 2nd, 2014

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Aug 27th, 2014

agarota asked:

What's the difference between a midwife and a doula?

themidwifeisin answered:

A doula is a support person who offers emotional, physical, and informational support to people who are pregnant and choosing abortion, adoption, and parenting.  They can coach breathing, rub backs, provide information about medications and procedures, help out at someone’s home during the postpartum period by doing dishes, washing laundry, holding the baby, etc.  They know the labor and birth process front-to-back and know how to help people through it.  They are not medical providers though - they cannot diagnose, prescribe medication, or make medical management decisions.

Certified Nurse Midwives are nurses with specialized Masters training specifically in reproductive health and labor and birth.  They can prescribe medications, do annual exams, insert IUDs, deliver babies, and make medical management decisions.  They often work with doulas in order to provide their patients with the best possible care.  Many midwives were once doulas themselves, and know how to use the same tips and tricks and techniques to support their patients through labor and birth and the postpartum period while also managing their healthcare. 

Certified Nurse Midwives provide the same type of care in hospitals for laboring and delivering patients as Obstetrician Gynecologists and other doctors who delivery babies.  They are able to order epidurals, prescribe pain medications, induce labors, etc. for all low-risk patients.  If a patient has a complication that is outside of the midwife’s experience or scope of practice, the midwife will often work in tandem with a doctor to provide the best care possible.

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